18th April, 2014

lamaschingonaa:

The Cenacle, also known as the Hall of the Last Supper or the Upper Room, is the site at which Jesus held the Last Supper with his disciples in the days leading up to his arrest and crucifixion. It is located on Mount Zion just outside the walls of the Old City of Jerusalem.
In Christian tradition, according to Acts 1:13, the Cenacle was not only the site of the Last Supper, but also the site where the Apostles regularly stayed in Jerusalem and it is regarded as the site of the first Christian Church.
The Cenacle is thus considered the site where many well-known Biblical events took place, including the washing of the feet, the gathering of disciples after the ascension, the election of Matthias as an apostle (who replaced Judas Iscariot), and the descent of the Holy Spirit upon the disciples on Pentecost.
Although the room has undergone multiple periods of de- and re-construction, it has been acknowledged as a Christian pilgrimage site since the 4th century. The original building the room is in was used as a synagogue which survived the Roman Emperor Titus’ destruction of Jerusalem in 70 A.D. The Cenacle is the only room in the building complex that has been spared numerous times from complete destruction. During Ottoman rule in the 16th century, the room was converted into a mosque, as evidenced by the mihrab in the direction of Mecca.
The structures found around the Upper Room are remnants of a time when the building was used as a Franciscan Friary.
The site is open for visitation from 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. daily.

lamaschingonaa:

The Cenacle, also known as the Hall of the Last Supper or the Upper Room, is the site at which Jesus held the Last Supper with his disciples in the days leading up to his arrest and crucifixion. It is located on Mount Zion just outside the walls of the Old City of Jerusalem.

In Christian tradition, according to Acts 1:13, the Cenacle was not only the site of the Last Supper, but also the site where the Apostles regularly stayed in Jerusalem and it is regarded as the site of the first Christian Church.

The Cenacle is thus considered the site where many well-known Biblical events took place, including the washing of the feet, the gathering of disciples after the ascension, the election of Matthias as an apostle (who replaced Judas Iscariot), and the descent of the Holy Spirit upon the disciples on Pentecost.

Although the room has undergone multiple periods of de- and re-construction, it has been acknowledged as a Christian pilgrimage site since the 4th century. The original building the room is in was used as a synagogue which survived the Roman Emperor Titus’ destruction of Jerusalem in 70 A.D. The Cenacle is the only room in the building complex that has been spared numerous times from complete destruction. During Ottoman rule in the 16th century, the room was converted into a mosque, as evidenced by the mihrab in the direction of Mecca.

The structures found around the Upper Room are remnants of a time when the building was used as a Franciscan Friary.

The site is open for visitation from 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. daily.

(via La boxeuse - blog on hiatus)

18th April, 2014

“As the scourging was the reparation for the sins of the flesh, so the crowning with thorns was the atonement for the sins of the mind – for the atheists who wish there were no God, for the doubters whose evil lives becloud their thinking, for the egotists, centered on themselves. The soldiers cursed as the thorns pricked their fingers. Then they cursed the Lord, as they drove the crown of thorns into His head, as a mockery of a royal diadem. Into His hands they placed a reed, the symbol of His kingdom, presumed to be false and unstable like the reed. His flesh, already hanging from Him like purple rags, is now covered with a purple robe to ridicule His claim to kingship of hearts and nations. Blindfolding Him, they struck Him, asking Him to prophesy, or tell whom it was that delivered the blow. They then bowed down before Him in mock reverence, spitting in His face, that all the subsequent Mindszentys, Stepinacs, and martyrs of the world might have courage in their hour of martyrdom. In this Mystery is verified the truth of our Savior’s warning: ‘If the world hates you, be sure that it hated Me before it learned to hat you. If you belonged to the world, the world would know you for its own and love you; it is because you do not belong to the world, because I have singled you out from the midst of the world, that the world hates you.’ He who expects to preserve His faith without being mocked by the world is either weak in it, or else not so bold in goodness as to draw upon himself the mocking insults of another purple robe and a torturing circle of thorns.”

— Archbishop Fulton J. Sheen (via confessionsofsomeoneanonymous)

(via RightandJust)

17th April, 2014

“Jesus alters the ritual of the Passover meal, which had been established by God himself through the ministry of Moses. In doing so, he confirms yet again his claim to be the Messiah (evident as well in his continued use of the Messiah’s prophetic title, Son of Man), and by doing so in his own name, he reiterates his claim to be the Son of God These changes shed light on just what kind of a King he is.

The unleavened bread commemorates the Israelites’ rushed departure from Egypt (they were hurrying too much to have time to bake leavened bread), and the cup—the third ceremonial glass of wine, commemorating past blessings—is drunk right after eating the sacrificial lamb and precedes a long prayer of thanksgiving This bread and wine become Christ’s body and blood, which are given up for the forgiveness of sins (just as the blood of animal sacrifices was poured out at the foot of the altar to atone for sins in the Old Covenant) Jesus also cuts the meal short .He declares he will not drink of the fruit of the vine again until he has entered into his Kingdom, even though normally a fourth cup was drunk at the end of the Passover supper, in anticipation of the future fulfillment of all God’s Old Testament promises.

Jesus thus turns this religious meal into an unbloody sacrifice that points towards the bloody sacrifice he will soon make on Calvary In so doing, he accrues to himself the roles of priest (he offers the sacrifice) and victim (his body and blood are offered.) And by inviting his Twelve Apostles to participate in the sacrifice and receive its benefits, he shows that his Kingship will be exercised in the total surrender of himself for the good of his subjects. Not only will his sacrifice wipe away their sins, but it will also elevate them to become, through Holy Communion, sharers in his royal and divine nature For us as well: if we eat his flesh and drink his blood, we will have his everlasting life within us. ….

The Mosaic and Levitical law prohibited all Jews from drinking the blood of their sacrifices, or even eating any meat with the blood still in it. In blood, they believed, was life, and all life belonged to God, it’s off-limits for men. So when Jesus commands them to take the cup of his blood and drink from it, the concept would have shocked them.

And yet, that Old Testament command had its purpose. Pagan religions had no prohibition against the consumption of blood. Pagans were accustomed to consuming bloody meat and bloody sacrifices. Just as they worshiped idols (creatures that were considered divine), they believed they could enter into communion with the divine through the consumption of those creatures’ blood. But the Jews were protected from such practices. They knew they had been created in God’s image, and that there was only one God, Creator of all things. And so, when Jesus proclaims a new covenant in his name—something only God could do—and then commands his followers to consume his precious blood in the Eucharist, the apostles would have gotten the message: the divine life of Christ was about to start flowing in their veins; the pagan sham is giving way to the real thing. The first time in their lives that they consumed blood of any kind was when they received their first Holy Communion.

How fitting it was that God had prepared so carefully, through the Mosaic customs, the men who first consumed Christ’s body and blood! It teaches us the reverence and gratitude with which we ought to treat this most Blessed Sacrament.”

— Commentary on Matthew 26 in The Better Part by John Bartunek, L.C. (Circle Press, 2007)

(via Intellect & Romance)

17th April, 2014

“Almighty God of justice and truth, you girded yourself with humility and washed your disciples feet. Now gird our waists with righteousness and bind our feet with holiness. Arm our bodies with purity and cleanse us from the corruption of our souls, so that we may glorify you, O Christ, now and for ever.”

From the Maronite Rite of Washing of Feet on Holy Thursday (via acatholicvibe)

(Source: maronitesoul)

(via Intellect & Romance)

16th April, 2014

“The old Catholic service of Tenebrae, or “darkness,” is a ceremony of encroaching shadows—the Crucifixion as eclipse. At the beginning of the rite, which takes place on the later days of Holy Week, a stand of fifteen candles is set before the congregation. As psalms are sung and prayers are recited, the candles are extinguished one by one until, by the end, a single flickering light remains. There is no other source of illumination. A strepitus, or loud noise, often made by slamming a book shut or dropping it on the floor, evokes the earthquake that is said to have followed Christ’s death. The congregation files out in silence. At least since the Middle Ages, this sombre piece of sacred theatre has included the chanting of passages from the Book of Lamentations, in which the prophet bewails the fall of Jerusalem and the Babylonian exile: “How doth the city sit solitary, that was full of people!””

— Alex Ross, “Singing Shadows

(via words of the popes)

16th April, 2014

intheshoes-ofthefisherman:

"The Sound of Holy Week"

Bells have been used in the Latin Mass of the Roman Catholic Church since at least the eighth century. A tradition developed of setting aside the bells during Holy Week, the week leading up to Easter Sunday, as their ringing was considered too joyous for such a somber time of the liturgical year and the bells were said to have flown to Rome. When the bells were not in use, they were replaced by a cog rattle—a noisemaker that produces a loud rattling sound when whirled around by its handle. This tradition still continues in certain Latin American countries.
A cog rattle is a relatively simple musical instrument, comprising an integral handle with a fluted cogwheel, and a box that encloses a wooden tongue. When the rattle is spun, the wooden tongue catches on the sharp edges on the cogwheel and produces the raucous sound. In addition to its service in the Mass, this type of instrument was used historically in processions and on naval vessels, where it was used as an alarm. Today, the instrument, often made of metal or plastic, is most commonly found at parties and carnivals.
The extraordinary example of the cog rattle found in the Museum’s collection is a survivor from the Renaissance, and dates from the fifteenth or sixteenth century. The box, or cage, that holds the wooden tongue is decorated with rough carvings, which include a small Roman cross.

Source: The Metropolitan Museum of Art

intheshoes-ofthefisherman:

"The Sound of Holy Week"

Bells have been used in the Latin Mass of the Roman Catholic Church since at least the eighth century. A tradition developed of setting aside the bells during Holy Week, the week leading up to Easter Sunday, as their ringing was considered too joyous for such a somber time of the liturgical year and the bells were said to have flown to Rome. When the bells were not in use, they were replaced by a cog rattle—a noisemaker that produces a loud rattling sound when whirled around by its handle. This tradition still continues in certain Latin American countries.

A cog rattle is a relatively simple musical instrument, comprising an integral handle with a fluted cogwheel, and a box that encloses a wooden tongue. When the rattle is spun, the wooden tongue catches on the sharp edges on the cogwheel and produces the raucous sound. In addition to its service in the Mass, this type of instrument was used historically in processions and on naval vessels, where it was used as an alarm. Today, the instrument, often made of metal or plastic, is most commonly found at parties and carnivals.

The extraordinary example of the cog rattle found in the Museum’s collection is a survivor from the Renaissance, and dates from the fifteenth or sixteenth century. The box, or cage, that holds the wooden tongue is decorated with rough carvings, which include a small Roman cross.

Source: The Metropolitan Museum of Art

(via words of the popes)

16th April, 2014

16th April, 2014

equamine:

byjoveimbeinghumble:

elizziebeth:


(x)

This is my inspiration right now. I wish I could take this and put it on my inspiration wall.


YES I AM. Doing my job - regardless of whether or not I love it - pays my bills. That means I have a bed, and food, and gas, and so on. I love Olan, but this is so frustrating. Doing any job will help you live. It may be painful as well, but a boring job will not kill you. GROW UP.

BUT YOU NEED TO DREAM BIG SHARON. 

TEAM PRACTICAL DREAMS, YO equamine:

byjoveimbeinghumble:

elizziebeth:


(x)

This is my inspiration right now. I wish I could take this and put it on my inspiration wall.


YES I AM. Doing my job - regardless of whether or not I love it - pays my bills. That means I have a bed, and food, and gas, and so on. I love Olan, but this is so frustrating. Doing any job will help you live. It may be painful as well, but a boring job will not kill you. GROW UP.

BUT YOU NEED TO DREAM BIG SHARON. 

TEAM PRACTICAL DREAMS, YO

equamine:

byjoveimbeinghumble:

elizziebeth:

(x)

This is my inspiration right now. I wish I could take this and put it on my inspiration wall.

YES I AM. Doing my job - regardless of whether or not I love it - pays my bills. That means I have a bed, and food, and gas, and so on. I love Olan, but this is so frustrating. Doing any job will help you live. It may be painful as well, but a boring job will not kill you. GROW UP.

BUT YOU NEED TO DREAM BIG SHARON.

TEAM PRACTICAL DREAMS, YO

(Source: henrycavills)

(via Impératrice)

16th April, 2014

un-moment-de-silence asks:

BUT WHAT IF I CAN LIVE THE DREAM SHARON (or Sharona, or Sharonda, or Therese, or sha-RON). WHAT IF I FIND THE DREAM JOB. DREAM THE JOB, JOB THE DREAM, WHAT IF THIS IS WHAT DREAMS ARE MADE OF ??? LIKE EVERY TEENAGE BOY IN MOVIES I WILL NOW SAY «I'm not giving up my dreams dad. I'm giving uP YOURS ». *DROP THE MIC* *DROP THE BASS* *DROP EVERYTHING AND BECOME A LLAMA TRAINER IN MANHATTAN* (Disclaimer: I'm actually a grown up woman and I'm afraid of llamas and the state of New York).

OH GOD i thought you were actually angry for a hot second and now I keep rereading your message and giggling and I just need to share this with the world